PTSD

After a traumatic experience, it's normal to feel frightened, sad, anxious, and disconnected. But if the upset doesn't fade and you feel stuck with a constant sense of danger and painful memories, you may be suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

It can seem like you'll never get over what happened or feel normal again. But by seeking treatment, reaching out for support, and developing new coping skills, you can overcome PTSD and move on with your life.

Types of treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

Trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy involves carefully and gradually “exposing” yourself to thoughts, feelings, and situations that remind you of the trauma. Therapy involves identifying upsetting thoughts about the traumatic event–particularly thoughts that are distorted and irrational—and replacing them with more balanced picture.

Family therapy can help your loved ones understand what you’re going through. It can also help everyone in the family communicate better and work through relationship problems caused by PTSD symptoms.

Medication is prescribed to people with PTSD to relieve secondary symptoms of depression or anxiety and help you feel less sad and worried